"The Old Folkies & Katie," at least for this gig, lay down some Ada 'Acoustic Alchemy' sounds every other Thursday evening at the library. Clockwise: James Reichley, Charlie Saylor, Katie Saylor, Doug Adams and Eric Shellenbarger - Ada Herald
"The Old Folkies & Katie," at least for this gig, lay down some Ada 'Acoustic Alchemy' sounds every other Thursday evening at the library. Clockwise: James Reichley, Charlie Saylor, Katie Saylor, Doug Adams and Eric Shellenbarger. (Ada Herald/Joe Schriner)

Every other Thursday at 6 p.m. in the Ada Library, local musicians gather for an “Acoustic Jam.”

Everybody (musicians, audience…) welcome!

Now while the musicians might, sometimes, vary a bit, the core group has been coming long enough that they’ve given themselves a name(s).

Ring leader, and guitarist, Charlie Saylor (not to be confused with: “And the ‘sailors’ say Brandy you’re a fine girl…”) winked and said the band’s name, this night, was: The Usual Suspects.

Yet on other nights, he smiled, we’re: The Old Folkies.

And folk songs were the order of this particular evening.

One of the songs was “America” by Simon & Garfunkel. (Remember them?)

And while the group this night sang that it took them “…four days to hitchhike from Saginaw,” some crack investigative work on my part revealed that these guys, and gal, actually drove their own vehicles to the library.

The band also played Simon & Garfunkel’s “The Boxer,” which features, perhaps, the most in-depth, incisive lyrics ever written…

“Lie la lie, lie la la la lie lie, lie la lie, lie la la la la lie la la lie…”

Following this, the band started “…movin’ on down the highway” to, of all places, West Virginia, where there were, of course, country roads, “mountain mommas,” and the like.

Katie Saylor (not to be confused with “Sail on, sail on, sailor…”) really belted out the West Virginia tune.

Other members of the quintet this evening were: James Reichley on banjo, Doug Adams on guitar, and Eric Shellenbarger, also on guitar.

Combined, they were laying down, not the more well-known England “Acoustic Alchemy” sound, but a just as, if not more, refreshing Ada ‘Acoustic Alchemy’ sound.

Not to mention the latter has a lot better vowel assonance (not to be confused with… oh, on second thought I won’t go there…) ring to it.