Ada's Fred Rush passed out campaign pens and buttons to all the Ada village councilmembers before, once again, giving another five-minute pitch for his county commissioner campaign. Since his first appearance, he said he has been ardently crisscrossing the county the past two months putting up signs, shaking hands, listening... (Ada Herald/Joe Schriner)
Ada's Fred Rush passed out campaign pens and buttons to all the Ada village councilmembers before, once again, giving another five-minute pitch for his county commissioner campaign. Since his first appearance, he said he has been ardently crisscrossing the county the past two months putting up signs, shaking hands, listening... (Ada Herald/Joe Schriner)

ADA — Ada’s Fred Rush is in a ‘rush.’

Seriously.

In the closing days of his County Commissioner candidate campaign, he is crisscrossing the county at a breakneck pace, or a reasonable facsimile thereof.

He officially started the campaigning January 12.

Mr. Rush said that, on average, he finds himself filling up his car with gas “…every other day.” He’s knocking on residential and business doors, attending council meetings, township trustee meetings, library board meetings…

He was back at the Ada Village Council Meeting recently for a second appearance, and gave another pitch to the councilmembers during the “Public Comments” section.

Mr. Rush said that, frankly, he hadn’t called ahead, just figured that showing up cold just might work. It did. He talked for some five minutes.

This is his first campaign, for anything.

Amidst the whirlwind activity, he said he now has much more respect for the national politicians, “no matter which party,” who are out there crisscrossing the country.

In a follow-up interview, Mr. Rush said that the two top issues for Hardin County voters that he’s gleaned from a Listening Tour, of sorts, are drugs and economic development.

Mr. Rush knows some about economic development, and business dynamics in general, having worked as a cost accountant and controller in the automotive industry. (He has an MBA from the University of Dayton.)

He is also a 1971 graduate of Hardin Northern High School. What’s more, he grew up on a farm just outside of Ada, and said he has a feel for agricultural issues as well.

During the Ada Council Meeting, Mr. Rush talked about some of his take on the drug problem here.

He said some of the dynamics revolve around self-esteem issues in some youth, as an example. That is, in not feeling good about themselves, they turn to a substance that will make them feel better. In addition, he said another contributing factor with youth involves peer pressure.

And finally, drawing on the kind of “common sense” he learned growing up on the farm, he said (metaphorically speaking) that when it came to certain things, parents of old would directly warn their children: “Don’t play with matches.”

He said in some cases these days, he believes some parents are short on doing this.

During the meeting, Mr. Rush was asked about how the county’s D.A.R.E. Program ties into impacting some of all this. His response was that he wasn’t too familiar with the program.

So, in the following days, he took the initiative to contact the D.A.R.E. Program’s local coordinator and set up a meeting to learn more about the program.