Ms. Boyd, colloquially known as "The Herb Lady," gave me a bit of a smirk when I asked her this one particular questions.  A question that was, okay, not all that particularly bright.  (Herald / Joe Schriner)
Ms. Boyd, colloquially known as "The Herb Lady," gave me a bit of a smirk when I asked her this one particular questions. A question that was, okay, not all that particularly bright. (Herald / Joe Schriner)

ADA - The 36th Annual Ada Harvest & Herb Festival drew booth vendors from all over Ohio, including Ann Boyd from Findlay.

Ms. Boyd’s booth was a menagerie of the more traditional herbs like thyme and rosemary, as well as the more exotic herbs like pineapple sage from Guatemala, fish mint from chorea, even the extremely rare papalo herb from South America.

After being virtually blown away with the variety, I asked Ms. Boyd, who had had a booth in the festival here every year since 2006, what draws her to this particular festival.

“Well, uh, part of the title is ‘Herb’ Festival,’” she half smiled.

Never overlook the obvious!

I then took my crack journalism intuitiveness further up Main Street, stopping at “The Inn at Ohio Northern University” booth. They had free, rather big, cookies.

So it didn’t look like I had just stopped there to get a free cookie, while I was eating the cookie, I took out my reporters notebook and asked some questions of, I was to find out, Shelby Higgins and Meghan Violet, “…spelled like the flower,” she smiled.

I told the women I was with the newspaper, and, pen poised, asked who the most famous person was who had ever stayed at “The Inn.”

“All our guests are ‘famous’ to us,” Ms. Higgins responded.

I said: “You’re the sales coordinator, right Shelby?” She was.

I then said: “Okay… good answer. But, I mean, who was the most famous, like FAMOUS, guest?”

Without skipping a beat, Ms. Higgins said: “Nellie.”

Then, noticing the quizzical look on my face, and realizing I was from a generation where “Nellie” would have merely conjured something like the expression: “Whoa, Nellie!”, Ms. Higgins quickly added: “The rapper.”

I recovered: “Oh, I’ve just had never heard of her,”

“Him,” Ms. Higgins said, with an expression somewhat similar to the herb lady’s expression moments earlier. I finished my big cookie quickly at this point.

Then, as I was walking away, I heard behind me, in a quite deep, heartfelt tone: “We are deeply sorry for your loss Greg.”

Knowing practically everyone in Ada, having been a reporter here now some three years now, I turned, thinking, not only would I know the person who was grieving, but condolences from me might be in order as well.

It turns out it was a married couple who were expressing their sincere regret to long-time Ada High School football coach Greg Grosley, who I noticed, with nothing more than a passing glance, was wearing a Notre Dame shirt.

But listening a bit more, it turns out, that shirt was, in fact, quite significant.

You see, the couple was trying to earnestly console Mr. Grosley ABOUT NOTRE DAME’S LOSS TO MARSHALL UNIVERSITY THE SATURDAY BEFORE!

Is it me, or are we starting to take football just a LITTLE too seriously in America these days?

Then it was off to the craft booth that had “WELCOME” door signs with Browns helmets on them. The sold for $225 apiece. I bought three, one for the front door, one for the back, and one for the shed door.