Sporting an "I Voted" sticker, Mayor Dave Retterer lauded the coordination involved with setting up the recent Guinness Book of World Records football toss during the council meeting Tuesday night. He was one of the throwers that day - Ada Herald
Sporting an "I Voted" sticker, Mayor Dave Retterer lauded the coordination involved with setting up the recent Guinness Book of World Records football toss during the council meeting Tuesday night. He was one of the throwers that day. (Ada Herald/Joe Schriner)

ADA — Tuesday night Ada Village Council addressed canines, zoning, and footballs… always footballs.

And I’ll get to the football thing in a minute.

For one, the council voted unanimously on a change to the zoning in the Ada Industrial Park, which allows for retail outlets and restaurants as, say, additions to factories, distilleries, and such, located out there.

The genesis for the zoning change discussion revolves around some initial interest in building a distillery, with a restaurant and gift shop in the Industrial Park. Ada Boyz Holdings, LLC, has been in discussion with the village per: the distillery.

The company already operates the “Burnt Church Distillery” in Bluffton, South Carolina. As of yet, nothing has been finalized with the Ada proposal.

But something was finalized with the ‘Oakley Proposal.’

As reported a couple weeks ago, the council voted to let the police dog, Oakley, retire with his Ada Police Officer “handler” Matt Purdy. (Purdy is retiring after 19 years.)

However, the stipulation was that $5,000 be paid for the dog. (The department had a lot of money invested in the dog, with training and all.)

This night, village council voted to appropriate the $5,000 to the Hardin County Sheriff’s Department Canine Program. The rationale was that the Sheriff’s Department was expanding the Canine Program, and Ada would have access to the Sheriff’s Department’s two dogs for situations that might arise in the village.

Ada Police Chief Michael Harnishfeger said after the meeting that his department, at present, didn’t have another “handler” for a police dog. So, in essence, council’s decision was a judicious one, he continued.

The chief also said his department was in the process of getting re-certified with the Ohio Collaborative Certified Agency, which was a Governor John Kasich era initiative to establish more unified police protocol around such areas as: use of force, body camera dynamics, bias free policing… And speaking of ‘policing’…

Village Administrator Jamie Hall explained, during an executive session break in the council meeting, that he had been tapped at the Ada/Guinness Book of World Records football toss to be one of the “official witnesses.” These witnesses were positioned in the press box at War Memorial Stadium, and also around the field. And for it to be considered a legitimate “mass moment,” all the footballs had to be in the air within three seconds.

This was accomplished, even with all the kindergarteners!

Mayor Dave Retterer, who was one of the “dignitary throwers” this day, said he was extremely impressed with how smoothly the event went, saying he heard some 50 people were involved with the organizing for this.

What’s not going as smoothly, of late, is leaf collection in Ada. In his Village Administrator’s report, Hall said the village leaf collecting machine was down and leaf collection schedules were off a bit. (The village is currently procuring a tractor to do manual loading of the leaves, and collection should be back on track shortly.)

There is a new village leaf collection machine on order, but it’s not scheduled to arrive for at least a month, or longer.

And finally, the mayor noted that there will be a Veterans Day Ceremony Monday at 11 a.m. at the Henry Lehr statue at ONU. Afterwards, the VFW Hall is having a Veterans Day Lunch from “1 p.m. until gone,” everyone welcome. (Veterans eat free and the charge is $9 to the general public.)