Rachel poses outside The Inn at ONU where she works as a bartender. She is posing in her Boston Marathon windbreaker, with the shoes she ran the race in slung over her shoulder - Ada Herald
Rachel poses outside The Inn at ONU where she works as a bartender. She is posing in her Boston Marathon windbreaker, with the shoes she ran the race in slung over her shoulder. (Ada Herald/Joe Schriner)

ADA — Rachel Mathewson is a bartender at the “Inn at ONU” who is living, in part, a double life.

While a laid-back, amiable sort behind the bar by night, by day, she is a driven, hardcore (she’s run the ultra-prestigious Boston Marathon twice, and counting) runner.

In her last “Boston” (2018), Rachel lined with 29, 979 runners. She finished in 18,571st place.

Impressive given, oh: she works nights, has seven children, and is 42-years-old.

What’s more, Boston was far from easy this last race.

Rachel said at race time it was 38 degrees, with gusts of head wind up to 40 mph. There was also a veritable torrential downpour. All of that never changed.

The only thing that did change, was Rachel started getting severe leg cramps 18 miles in. Yet she doggedly fought through them the next eight miles.

Her finishing time amidst all this physical and climatic adversity? A respectable 4:15.

She qualified for Boston in the Columbus Marathon the year before with a time of 3:38.

Rachel started running the 3,200 meter race on the track team at a high school in West Salem, Ohio. She graduated from there in 1991, and immediately stopped running.

In 1994, she started running again.

Her first marathon was a fundraising “Run for Africa,” with her Assembly of God Church family pledging money for her run.

Then it was another marathon, and another…

Then she qualified for Boston the first time at the Columbus Marathon in 2010 with a time of 3:36 at age 34.

For 2019, Rachel will move into the ultra-marathon sphere with a 30-mile race in Delaware, Ohio, followed by a 50-mile race at Mohican State Park, also in Ohio.

She will try to qualify for Boston (2020) again at Toledo’s Glass City Marathon this year, as well.

Rachel is married to a former Marine. Instead of your traditional ‘dinner and a movie’ date, they do stuff like the relatively new “Savage Races” together, traversing ankle deep mud, climbing steep obstacle walls, crawling under barbed wire.

Rachel said she looks at running as a “positive addiction.” And she added that she hopes modeling the healthy lifestyle that comes along with it, and not giving up when the going gets tough, is a “positive example” to her children.